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Right-Wing Radio Host Argues Against Teaching Shakespeare

Puritan book burning (1643).
In Wonkette, "Doktor Zoom" describes the right-wing radio host Kevin Swanson's Apostate: The Men Who Destroyed the Christian West. Swanson believes that
[y]oung, impressionable minds can “cut themselves” on the “great books,” and sometimes the wounds get infected. This is usually how we lose our best and brightest young students to the other side, generation after generation. 
According to Swanson, one of those books is Shakespeare's Complete Works. He worries that the sonnets' homoeroticism "introduces dangerous gender confusion into the minds of men" and that Shakespeare's "fundamental worldview was not openly and obviously Christian." Swanson finds Macbeth particularly distressing since
[i]n the familiar scene, Lady Macbeth attempts to wash away the bloodguilt with water, but to no avail. No mention is made of the blood of Christ. Not surprisingly, the central position of Jesus ... is completely ignored. 

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