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Shakespeare Silent Film Clips on YouTube

I recommend turning off the sound when you watch these. The music often doesn't match.
  • Herbert Beerbohm Tree performs the death scene from King John in the earliest Shakespeare movie (1899).
  • Charles Kent and J. Stuart Blackton's 1909 film of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
  • Scenes from Gerolamo Lo Savio's 1910 film of The Merchant of Venice.
  • Frederick Warde as Richard seduces Anne in M. B. Dudley's 1912 feature film of Richard III (the best of the two surviving silent Richards).
  • Johnston Forbes Robertson meets the Ghost in a 1913 version of Hamlet.

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