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New Shakespeare Documentary

The filmmakers who gave us the extraordinary Shakespeare Behind Bars describe their new movie
"STILL DREAMING" is a documentary about a group of elderly entertainers as they bravely mount Shakespeare's romp through a moonlit forest, "A Midsummer Night's Dream". Set at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in Englewood, New Jersey, this troupe has decided to take a huge leap of faith into what was once known, but is now so seemingly treacherous.  
Stretching their physical, emotional and mental limits, the elders take the six week journey together to mount a production. The stakes are high for these actors, as this just might be their last work. Some are thrilled at the prospect of one last chance to perform. Some are petrified or even embarrassed by re-entering a process with fewer faculties than they had in their prime. And some have never even acted before, but are game for something interesting to do rather than playing bingo.  
The Lillian Booth Actors Home hires two young up and coming Shakespeare directors from NYC's Fiasco Theatre to direct the play, Ben Steinfeld and Noah Brody. Ben and Noah's collaboration with the elders is an interesting study in what works and what doesn't in terms of undertaking a creative endeavor with an older population. Not fully understanding the limitations of the aging process, they begin to rely on the staff of the Lillian Booth to help them navigate the sometimes tricky waters of afflictions such as dementia, Alzheimer's and the various physical indignities of old age.

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